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Orchids
in brief

Orchidaceae is with it's 25.000 to 30.000 species the biggest among plants. Besides that there are 100.000 hybrids at the marked, and every year comes more, not only hybrids, but also species, that is found in the wild.
Orchids are growing all over the world, and they are growing all places where it's possible for plants to grow. And that's  straight from the strong windy mountain tops to tropical jungle. They cling to recess in the bitterly cold arctic areas and in the warmest and driest desserts.
Some orchids , the so called epiphyts, grows in the trees, while other grows in the ground.
Also what appearance concerns, there is a big different between orchids. They are spreading from the delicate tropical beauty, which we know from the window frame, to modest, very little conspicuous genus, that you not  at first would connect with orchids.
The orchids at this page can all grow in Danish gardens. They all come from temperate areas on the northern hemisphere, and grows in Europe, Asia and North America.

Orchids are listed, but micropropagation (in vitro) has done, that they are available at the market to a fairly manageable price.
But orchids are still quite expensive, and the cultivation can be difficult (for some genus), so it is advisable to learn about the growing conditions for just that plant that you want to purchase.
And take care of the fertilization. Most orchids don't tolerate fertilization, what also had lead to, the disappearing of a lot of orchids from the Danish nature because of the intensive cultivation and fertilization at their growing places.
In the following there is a short description over the general growing conditions. You can find a more comprehensive description in different orchids sites in our page with links.

The genus of orchids you often se in Danish gardens are as following:

 

 

Calanthe tricaniata

 

Amitostigma keisukei

 

Dactylorhiza. There are about 50 species. Mostly demand a moist, humus rich, chalky soil, and prefer full light to half shade. They are quite easy to grow.
The root is a tuber divided in "fingers".
Dactylorhiza elata
Cypripedium. Also in this genus there are about 50 different species. Generally they demand a moist, humus rich soil with good drainage. The most like chalky soil, but some few want acid soil, and they all thrives best in half shade or light shade. Don't plant Cypripedium too deep. "The eye" must be placed just under the surface. Most Cypripedium likes a little fertilize, but be careful. Cypripedium guttatum
Epipactis. The genus contains of perhaps 70 species. By the most it grows in chalky soil in more or less moist areas, and often in full or half shade.
Orchis. There are about 50-60 different species (the information is very variable). Orchis generally grows in a quite dry chalky soul. It often confuses with Dactylorhiza, but you can recognize it at the tuber, which is round, and not divided in "fingers" as Dactylorhiza (orchis is the Greek name of testicle).
Epipactis thunbergii
Orchis. There are about 50-60 different species (the information is very variable). Orchis generally grows in a quite dry chalky soul. It often confuses with Dactylorhiza, but you can recognize it at the tuber, which is round, and not divided in "fingers" as Dactylorhiza (orchis is the Greek name of testicle). Orchis aristata
Ophrys is a big group at about 150-300 species (the information is very variable), where a big part grows in South Europe, and maybe hardiness for this part is doubtful in this Denmark. The flower looks like a bee. It grows in dry to wed soil, neutral to chalky and in full light or half shade, all depending on species.